a
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
CORONAVIRUS
Latest Advice
Symptoms
The most common symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of:
  • New continuous cough and/or
  • High temperature
  • loss or change to your sense of smell or taste  

For most people, coronavirus (COVID-19) will be a mild illness If you have coronavirus symptoms:
  • Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital
  • You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you're staying at home
  • Testing for coronavirus is not needed if you're staying at home
  • Plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home and consider what can be done for vulnerable people in the household
  • Ask your employer, friends and family to help you to get the things you need to stay at home
  • Wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser
  • If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 7 days, then use the NHS 111 online coronavirus service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999
  • Visit NHS 111 Online for more information

Stay at Home
  • If you live alone and you have symptoms of coronavirus illness (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home for 7 days from when your symptoms started. (See ending isolation section below for more information)
  • If you live with others and you or one of them have symptoms of coronavirus, then all household members must stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the house became ill
  • It is likely that people living within a household will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community
  • For anyone in the household who starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for 7 days from when the symptoms appeared, regardless of what day they are on in the original 14 day isolation period. (See ending isolation section below for more information
  • If you can, move any vulnerable individuals (such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions) out of your home, to stay with friends or family for the duration of the home isolation period
  • If you cannot move vulnerable people out of your home, stay away from them as much as possible
Find out more about UK Gov Coronavirus Response
Don't show this again
Shopping Cart
In Store
Total
Online
Total Excl VAT
VAT
Total
Checkout
Contact
Open Hours
Branches
Login/Logout
Vaccines
Destinations
BLOG
What we have to say about your health and well being
10
Jul 2018
Menopause

What is the menopause?

Menopause is the point in a woman's life at which she is no longer fertile, and menstrual periods have ceased, for a period of 12 months.

Periods usually start to become less frequent over a few months or years before they stop altogether. Sometimes they can stop suddenly.

The process of menopause does not occur overnight, but rather it is gradual process. This so-called perimenopausal transition period is a different experience for each woman. The time of transition can take between two to ten years and in this time a woman can experience a whole host of symptoms.

The menopause is a natural part of ageing that usually occurs between 45 and 55 years of age, as a woman's oestrogen levels decline. In the UK, the average age for a woman to reach the menopause is 51. For some women it can start as early as their 30s or as late as their 60s.

Symptoms of the menopause

In the months or years leading up to menopause (perimenopause), you might experience these signs and symptoms:

  • Irregular periods
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Hot flashes
  • Chills
  • Night sweats
  • Sleep problems
  • Mood changes
  • Weight gain and slowed metabolism
  • Thinning hair and dry skin
  • Loss of breast fullness

As mentioned earlier, women will have very different experiences and symptoms during the menopause. Your GP can usually confirm whether you are menopausal based on your symptoms, but a blood test to measure your hormone levels may be carried out if you're aged 40 to 45.

Treatment of symptoms

For some women the symptoms can be severe and can affect daily life.

Your GP can prescribe various medications based on hormone replacement therapy as it is the decline in oestrogen that is happening to the body at this time.

  • hormone replacement therapy (HRT) – tablets, skin patches, gels and implants that relieve menopausal symptoms by replacing oestrogen
  • vaginal oestrogen creams, lubricants or moisturisers for vaginal dryness

It is also important to maintain a healthy diet and exercise as this can also help alleviate some of the symptoms.

Complementary and alternative treatments aren't recommended for symptoms of the menopause, because it's generally unclear how safe and effective they are.

Some remedies can also interact with other medications and cause side effects.

Ask your GP or pharmacist for advice if you're thinking about using a complementary therapy.

For further information visit:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/menopause/treatment/#complementary-and-alternative-therapies

Alternatively speak to your GP if you feel you are experiencing any of these symptoms and want further advice.

By Sabina Mohmed

CONTACT
119 Lee Lane,Horwich
Horwich
Greater Manchester
BL6 7AR
01204 697390
Contact Head Office
INFORMATION
Company Registration
3903928
Premises GPhC Number
See branch list
Superintendant
Asif Adam (2052062)
BRANCHES
Hootons Pharmacy
Whittlebrook Pharmacy (Whittle)
Ribbleton Pharmacy
Smiths Pharmacy
Ladybridge Pharmacy
Smithsons Pharmacy
See All Branches
Cookie Policy
Privacy Policy
Terms And Conditions
Copyright 2019
Shopping